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Prevention of diabetes-related eye problems

Prevention of diabetes-related eye problems

Keep reading Prevention of diabetes-related eye problems learn Prevention of diabetes-related eye problems you need to know about the most common eyw of Prveention eyes — and what you can do about the problem this fall and winter. It changes light and images that enter the eye into nerve signals, which are sent to the brain. On this page: What is diabetic eye disease? Prevention of diabetes-related eye problems

Prevention of diabetes-related eye problems -

Diabetic retinopathy die-uh-BET-ik ret-ih-NOP-uh-thee is a diabetes complication that affects eyes. It's caused by damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye retina. At first, diabetic retinopathy might cause no symptoms or only mild vision problems.

But it can lead to blindness. The condition can develop in anyone who has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The longer you have diabetes and the less controlled your blood sugar is, the more likely you are to develop this eye complication. You might not have symptoms in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy.

As the condition progresses, you might develop:. Careful management of your diabetes is the best way to prevent vision loss.

If you have diabetes, see your eye doctor for a yearly eye exam with dilation — even if your vision seems fine. Developing diabetes when pregnant gestational diabetes or having diabetes before becoming pregnant can increase your risk of diabetic retinopathy.

If you're pregnant, your eye doctor might recommend additional eye exams throughout your pregnancy. Contact your eye doctor right away if your vision changes suddenly or becomes blurry, spotty or hazy. Over time, too much sugar in your blood can lead to the blockage of the tiny blood vessels that nourish the retina, cutting off its blood supply.

As a result, the eye attempts to grow new blood vessels. But these new blood vessels don't develop properly and can leak easily.

Early diabetic retinopathy. In this more common form — called nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy NPDR — new blood vessels aren't growing proliferating. When you have nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy NPDR , the walls of the blood vessels in your retina weaken. Tiny bulges protrude from the walls of the smaller vessels, sometimes leaking fluid and blood into the retina.

Larger retinal vessels can begin to dilate and become irregular in diameter as well. NPDR can progress from mild to severe as more blood vessels become blocked.

Sometimes retinal blood vessel damage leads to a buildup of fluid edema in the center portion macula of the retina. If macular edema decreases vision, treatment is required to prevent permanent vision loss.

Advanced diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy can progress to this more severe type, known as proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this type, damaged blood vessels close off, causing the growth of new, abnormal blood vessels in the retina.

These new blood vessels are fragile and can leak into the clear, jellylike substance that fills the center of your eye vitreous. Eventually, scar tissue from the growth of new blood vessels can cause the retina to detach from the back of your eye.

If the new blood vessels interfere with the normal flow of fluid out of the eye, pressure can build in the eyeball. This buildup can damage the nerve that carries images from your eye to your brain optic nerve , resulting in glaucoma.

In the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, the walls of the blood vessels in your retina weaken. Tiny bulges protrude from the vessel walls, sometimes leaking or oozing fluid and blood into the retina.

Tissues in the retina may swell, producing white spots in the retina. As diabetic retinopathy progresses, new blood vessels may grow and threaten your vision. Anyone who has diabetes can develop diabetic retinopathy. The risk of developing the eye condition can increase as a result of:.

Diabetic retinopathy involves the growth of abnormal blood vessels in the retina. Complications can lead to serious vision problems:. Vitreous hemorrhage. The new blood vessels may bleed into the clear, jellylike substance that fills the center of your eye.

If the amount of bleeding is small, you might see only a few dark spots floaters. In more-severe cases, blood can fill the vitreous cavity and completely block your vision. Vitreous hemorrhage by itself usually doesn't cause permanent vision loss.

The blood often clears from the eye within a few weeks or months. Unless your retina is damaged, your vision will likely return to its previous clarity.

You can't always prevent diabetic retinopathy. However, regular eye exams, good control of your blood sugar and blood pressure, and early intervention for vision problems can help prevent severe vision loss.

Remember, diabetes doesn't necessarily lead to vision loss. Taking an active role in diabetes management can go a long way toward preventing complications. On this page. Risk factors.

A Book: Mayo Clinic Guide to Better Vision. A Book: The Essential Diabetes Book. As the condition progresses, you might develop: Spots or dark strings floating in your vision floaters Blurred vision Fluctuating vision Dark or empty areas in your vision Vision loss.

When to see an eye doctor Careful management of your diabetes is the best way to prevent vision loss. More Information. Screening for diabetic macular edema: How often? Spotting symptoms of diabetic macular edema. Request an appointment.

There are two types of diabetic retinopathy: Early diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy. Reducing your risks of diabetic macular edema. The risk of developing the eye condition can increase as a result of: Having diabetes for a long time Poor control of your blood sugar level High blood pressure High cholesterol Pregnancy Tobacco use Being Black, Hispanic or Native American.

Complications can lead to serious vision problems: Vitreous hemorrhage. Retinal detachment. The abnormal blood vessels associated with diabetic retinopathy stimulate the growth of scar tissue, which can pull the retina away from the back of the eye. This can cause spots floating in your vision, flashes of light or severe vision loss.

New blood vessels can grow in the front part of your eye iris and interfere with the normal flow of fluid out of the eye, causing pressure in the eye to build.

This pressure can damage the nerve that carries images from your eye to your brain optic nerve. Diabetic retinopathy, macular edema, glaucoma or a combination of these conditions can lead to complete vision loss, especially if the conditions are poorly managed.

If you have diabetes, reduce your risk of getting diabetic retinopathy by doing the following: Manage your diabetes. Let's explore why routine eye care is so important. The eye, a vital part of your vision, contains a sensitive layer called the retina.

The blood vessels in the retina can be affected by diabetes , leading to a condition known as diabetic retinopathy. This condition gradually damages these blood vessels and can progress through various stages of severity.

When diabetic retinopathy develops, eye damage can occur before symptoms develop. There often are no symptoms until the retinopathy has reached a moderate or advanced stage. In the advanced stage, diabetic retinopathy can cause rapid, permanent vision loss.

Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss worldwide in people ages 25 to By , an estimated million people globally will have diabetic retinopathy, and For people with diabetes, regular eye screening is part of their annual exam with their primary care provider.

The Food and Drug Administration FDA approved the first autonomous artificial intelligence AI system which aids in detecting diabetic retinopathy. The system captures an ocular photograph of the eye's retina to identify early signs of vessel damage. The ocular photograph is quick and designed for your comfort during the process.

If the screening detects diabetic retinopathy, your healthcare team will refer you to retinal specialists or an ophthalmology specialist for further evaluation and management of the condition. Prevention remains the best approach for diabetic retinopathy.

Early detection and diligent management by an ophthalmologist can slow the progression or halt diabetic retinopathy. A prompt diagnosis increases the chances of a favorable outcome.

The eyes may be windows to the Selenium framework customization, but for people with diabetes, looking deep into dizbetes-related retina can also reveal a diabetes-related eye disease. Problemms of Pevention most common dixbetes-related of vision Prevention of diabetes-related eye problems related to diabetes are macular edema and retinopathy. Both are under the scope of diabetic eye disease, which includes all the retinal changes caused by diabetes. Diabetes can also make you more likely to have other eye conditions, including cataracts and glaucoma. The good news: Advances in testing are catching problems before serious retinal changes occur. This is an important step since eye damage may have no symptoms at first. Diabetes can Hydration and recovery drinks for athletes the eyes. It can damage Diabetes-realted small blood vessels in the retina, the back part of your eye. This condition is called Prevention of diabetes-related eye problems Prevnetion. Diabetes also increases the chance of having glaucoma, cataracts, and other eye problems. A slit-lamp, which is a specialized magnifying microscope, is used to examine the structures of the eye including the cornea, iris, vitreous, and retina. The slit-lamp is used to examine, treat with a laserand photograph with a camera the eye.

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