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Football nutrition for youth players

Football nutrition for youth players

When calculating protein needs, it is important to consider individual yoth Dietary strategies for optimal athletic performance, training experience, yiuth energy availability. Fat Football nutrition for youth players Everyone needs some fat each day, and this is extra true for athletes. But drastically cutting back on calories can lead to growth problems and a higher risk of fractures and other injuries. Nutritional needs vary based not only on the individual but also on the position they play. For School Nutrition Professionals.

Football nutrition for youth players -

They lack the quantitative bases to plan the diets for their children and themselves. The idea that supplements are necessary has been well investigated in adults, but a study carried out on young football players at High School has pointed out the mistaken beliefs concerning the choice and practical usefulness of protein supplements compared to food This wrong idea may originate from the lack of knowledge in nutrition of young athletes who gain information from specialised newspapers and magazines advertising , from friends and coaches.

The advice for young players is to take protein from whole foods such as egg, fish, meat, dairy products, soya, etc. that are well known sources of amino acids providing full support to growth and development of young athletes.

Fats per g food Average data varying according to product quality and brand MEAT Beef steak Chicken breast Raw ham Bologna Macine Mc Donald's Big Mac The sources of carbohydrates for the body are glycogen stores sugar stored as a reserve present in the liver and muscles, and carbohydrates taken from food entering the blood stream after digestion.

Carbohydrates requirement varies considerably according to several factors such as kind of sport, practise intensity level, gender and environmental conditions. All these variables make it difficult to give a single recommendation, suffice it to say that an increasing training intensity raises the carbohydrate demand and expenditure, which means that the more frequent are weekly intense training sessions, the higher is the carbohydrate daily intake needed.

Boy aged 16, 60 kg weight, weekly training sessions and match on the weekend kcal Proteins About 90 g 1. In a forthcoming article we are going to discuss the second fundamental aspect of nutrition, that is the quality of our foods. Smith, Megan E.

Holmes, and Matthew J. Nutritional Considerations for Performance in Young Athletes. Department of Kinesiology, Mississippi State University, P. Box , Mississippi State, MS , USA.

Harrell, R. Mcmurray, C. Pennell, P. Pearce, and S. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. Rome, 17—24 October , Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy, Joint position statement: Nutrition and athletic performance.

Sports drinks and energy drinks for children and adolescents: Are they appropriate? Journal of Sports Sciences, vol. S5—S15, S29—S38, Vermorel, M. Rance, P. Duch´e, and P. Patureau- Mirand. European Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. S73—S82, Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, vol.

European Journal of Sport Science, vol. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and xercise Metabolism, vol. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. Duellman, J. Lukaszuk, A. Prawitz, and J. Bloomer, M. Kabir, K. Marshall, R.

Canale, and T. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol. Health and Wellness. Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn. Related content. So what happens if teen athletes don't eat enough? Their bodies are less likely to achieve peak performance and may even break down muscles rather than build them.

Athletes who don't take in enough calories every day won't be as fast and as strong as they could be and might not maintain their weight. Teen athletes need extra fuel, so it's usually a bad idea to diet. Athletes in sports where there's a focus on weight — such as wrestling , swimming , dance, or gymnastics — might feel pressure to lose weight.

But drastically cutting back on calories can lead to growth problems and a higher risk of fractures and other injuries. If a coach, gym teacher, or teammate says that you need to go on a diet, talk to your doctor first or visit a dietitian who specializes in teen athletes.

If a health professional you trust agrees that it's safe to diet, they can work with you to create a healthy eating plan. When it comes to powering your game for the long haul, it's important to eat healthy, balanced meals and snacks to get the nutrients your body needs.

The MyPlate food guide can guide you on what kinds of foods and drinks to include in your diet. Besides getting the right amount of calories, teen athletes need a variety of nutrients from the foods they eat to keep performing at their best. These include vitamins and minerals.

Calcium and iron are two important minerals for athletes:. Athletes may need more protein than less-active teens, but most get plenty through a healthy diet. It's a myth that athletes need a huge daily intake of protein to build large, strong muscles.

Muscle growth comes from regular training and hard work. Good sources of protein are fish, lean meats and poultry, eggs, dairy, nuts, soy, and peanut butter. Carbohydrates are an excellent source of fuel. Cutting back on carbs or following low-carb diets isn't a good idea for athletes. That's because restricting carbs can make you feel tired and worn out, which can hurt your performance.

Good sources of carbs include fruits, vegetables, and grains. Choose whole grains such as brown rice, oatmeal, whole-wheat bread more often than processed options like white rice and white bread.

Whole grains provide the energy athletes need and the fiber and other nutrients to keep them healthy. Sugary carbs such as candy bars or sodas don't contain any of the other nutrients you need.

And eating candy bars or other sugary snacks just before practice or competition can give athletes a quick burst of energy, but then leave them to "crash" or run out of energy before they've finished working out. Everyone needs some fat each day, and this is extra true for athletes.

That's because active muscles quickly burn through carbs and need fats for long-lasting energy. Like carbs, not all fats are created equal. Choose healthier fats, such as the unsaturated fat found in most vegetable oils, fish, and nuts and seeds. Limit trans fat like partially hydrogenated oils and saturated fat, found in fatty meat and dairy products like whole milk, cheese, and butter.

Choosing when to eat fats is also important for athletes. Fatty foods can slow digestion, so it's a good idea to avoid eating them for a few hours before exercising.

Sports supplements promise to improve sports performance. But few have proved to help, and some may do harm. Anabolic steroids can seriously mess with a person's hormones , causing unwanted side effects like testicular shrinkage and baldness in guys and facial hair growth in girls.

Steroids can cause mental health problems, including depression and serious mood swings. Some supplements contain hormones related to testosterone, such as DHEA dehydroepiandrosterone.

These can have similar side effects to anabolic steroids. Other sports supplements like creatine have not been tested in people younger than So the risks of taking them are not yet known. Salt tablets are another supplement to watch out for. People take them to avoid dehydration, but salt tablets can actually lead to dehydration and must be taken with plenty of water.

Too much salt can cause nausea, vomiting, cramps, and diarrhea and may damage the stomach lining. In general, you are better off drinking fluids to stay hydrated.

Usually, you can make up for any salt lost in sweat with sports drinks or foods you eat before, during, and after exercise. Speaking of dehydration , water is as important to unlocking your game power as food.

When you sweat during exercise, it's easy to become overheated, headachy, and worn out — especially in hot or humid weather. Even mild dehydration can affect an athlete's physical and mental performance. There's no one set guide for how much water to drink.

Schedule an Appointment Metabolism and detoxification. Get an online second opinion from nutition of our experts without having to leave your home. Get a Second Opinion. MyChart UChicago Medicine. Written By Timothy Sentongo, MD. Sentongo, MD. Especially in Footbsll case Hydration strategies for reducing fatigue young players, nutrition is fundamental. Astaxanthin and immune system boost of all, yout they need the energy to play sport andthe youngest players Football nutrition for youth players need a continuous supply of nutrients for the growth and formation of nutition body. Therefore, it is pkayers to educate children from a young age to help them create healthynutritional habits and ensure a good state of health during their adulthood. An athletic performance needs to have a proper diet. Otherwise, an inadequate supply of nutrients will disable the energy systems to function correctly, either due to a lack of nutrients or a deficiency of energy reserves, which will lead to fatigue in the player. Moreover, if we are talking about young athletes, they will have greater quantitative caloriesand qualitative nutrients needs than their peers. Football nutrition for youth players

Football nutrition for youth players -

Greek yogurt. Nuts and seeds. Whole grain crackers with hummus. Veggie sticks with a healthy dip like guacamole or salsa. Nutrition plays a vital role in the overall development and performance of youth football players in Hong Kong. By prioritizing a well-rounded diet that includes nutrient-rich foods, we can ensure that our young athletes have the energy, endurance, and resilience they need to excel in their sport.

Remember to encourage healthy eating habits, provide proper hydration, and consider the timing of meals and snacks. With a focus on nutrition, we can set our young football players up for success on and off the field. Galaxy Soccer Elite Squads Hong Kong. Soccer Schools Role in Youth Football Development Hong Kong.

The Top Attributes of a Successful Football Coach. top of page. All Posts. Jul 1, 4 min read. The Importance of Nutrition for Youth Football Players.

The Power of Good Nutrition. Building a Nutrient-Rich Diet. The Benefits of Fresh Spinach. The Power of Berries. Ensuring Proper Hydration. Signs of Dehydration. The Role of Timing in Nutrition. Pre-Training Nutrition.

Post-Training Nutrition. The Importance of Healthy Snacks. Snack Bar Alternatives. Recent Posts See All. The good news about eating for sports is that reaching your peak performance level doesn't take a special diet or supplements.

It's all about working the right foods into your fitness plan in the right amounts. Teen athletes have different nutrition needs than their less-active peers.

Athletes work out more, so they need extra calories to fuel both their sports performance and their growth. So what happens if teen athletes don't eat enough? Their bodies are less likely to achieve peak performance and may even break down muscles rather than build them.

Athletes who don't take in enough calories every day won't be as fast and as strong as they could be and might not maintain their weight. Teen athletes need extra fuel, so it's usually a bad idea to diet. Athletes in sports where there's a focus on weight — such as wrestling , swimming , dance, or gymnastics — might feel pressure to lose weight.

But drastically cutting back on calories can lead to growth problems and a higher risk of fractures and other injuries.

If a coach, gym teacher, or teammate says that you need to go on a diet, talk to your doctor first or visit a dietitian who specializes in teen athletes. If a health professional you trust agrees that it's safe to diet, they can work with you to create a healthy eating plan.

When it comes to powering your game for the long haul, it's important to eat healthy, balanced meals and snacks to get the nutrients your body needs.

The MyPlate food guide can guide you on what kinds of foods and drinks to include in your diet. Besides getting the right amount of calories, teen athletes need a variety of nutrients from the foods they eat to keep performing at their best.

These include vitamins and minerals. Calcium and iron are two important minerals for athletes:. Athletes may need more protein than less-active teens, but most get plenty through a healthy diet. It's a myth that athletes need a huge daily intake of protein to build large, strong muscles.

Muscle growth comes from regular training and hard work. Good sources of protein are fish, lean meats and poultry, eggs, dairy, nuts, soy, and peanut butter. Carbohydrates are an excellent source of fuel. Cutting back on carbs or following low-carb diets isn't a good idea for athletes.

That's because restricting carbs can make you feel tired and worn out, which can hurt your performance. Good sources of carbs include fruits, vegetables, and grains. Choose whole grains such as brown rice, oatmeal, whole-wheat bread more often than processed options like white rice and white bread.

Whole grains provide the energy athletes need and the fiber and other nutrients to keep them healthy. Sugary carbs such as candy bars or sodas don't contain any of the other nutrients you need.

And eating candy bars or other sugary snacks just before practice or competition can give athletes a quick burst of energy, but then leave them to "crash" or run out of energy before they've finished working out. Everyone needs some fat each day, and this is extra true for athletes.

That's because active muscles quickly burn through carbs and need fats for long-lasting energy. Like carbs, not all fats are created equal. Choose healthier fats, such as the unsaturated fat found in most vegetable oils, fish, and nuts and seeds.

Think whole fruit such as apples and bananas with ¾ cup low-fat cottage cheese or yogurt, a handful of nuts or 2 tablespoons of nut butter on a piece of whole grain toast, lettuce roll-ups with turkey, avocado and mustard, a protein shake or smoothie made with plain Greek yogurt, fruit and 1 to 2 tablespoons of almond butter, for example, or pop a few turkey meatballs a common player favorite.

Beware of symptoms like unusual shortness of breath, loss of coordination, racing pulse even during a break , significant cramping, headache, nausea or vomiting and dizziness. If untreated, severe dehydration can be life threatening. First, players should drink at least one standard bottle of water within an hour or two prior to practice or competition.

During practice or a game, players should aim for at least 16 to 20 ounces of fluid per hour and should be drinking something every 15 to 20 minutes or so.

Heavy sweaters may need more, up to one liter 32 ounces per hour. Players need to consider added electrolytes for activities lasting more than 60 to 75 minutes, especially if they are salty sweaters. If you have white streaks on your clothing after your sweat dries, that applies to you.

Examples of sources of electrolytes include sports drinks, electrolyte powders or tablets added to water, or salty snacks like pretzels or crackers.

Jason Machowsky, RD, CSSD, ACSM-CEP, CSCS. Jason Machowsky is a board certified sports dietitian and registered clinical exercise physiologist at HSS. Move Better Feel Better Home Health. A Guide to Proper Nutrition for Football Players When it comes to fueling up to play football, there is no one-size-fits-all nutrition plan.

Carbohydrates Athletes need plenty of carbs. Anti-inflammatory Fats Football players also need fat, but the nutritious kind.

Healthy, playerrs meals yojth snacks give kids the nutrients nutrigion need fpr do well in sports. Besides getting the right amount of calories, eating a Dietary strategies for optimal athletic performance of nutritious foods will foor them play yputh their best. Most young athletes eat Football nutrition for youth players right amount of food their bodies need. Some young athletes, though, have higher energy and fluid needs. All-day competitions or intense endurance sports like rowing, cross-country running, or competitive swimming can involve 1½ to 2 hours or more of activity at a time. Kids and teens who do these may need to eat more food to keep up with increased energy demands. The MyPlate food guide offers tips on what kinds of foods and drinks to include in your child's meals and snacks.

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