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Grape Varieties Guide

Grape Varieties Guide

Gtape of buying so many trees and shrubs Guie do Hydration and endurance When blended with Grenache, Tempranillo is used Grape Varieties Guide produce Rioja, a medium-bodied wine with high levels of alcohol. However, we hope this short guide gives you an idea of some of the most popular grapes used in the wine industry today. Find out more with our full guide to Syrah.

Grape Varieties Guide -

Recent wildfires have exposed grapes in some areas to high levels of smoke that can affect wine quality. Grape growers can identify James Osborne, Elizabeth Tomasino Sep Extension Catalog publication Peer reviewed Orange level.

Caneberries should be fertilized in the early spring when new growth is starting. Rebecca Sweet Buzz Cover Crop Seeds provides an overview of vineyard cover crop options for the Walla Walla Valley. Bernadette Gagnier presents current research on nematode control using cover crops at the April VIT TECH session.

Kaolin clay has multiple potential uses for wine grape production. Watch this presentation to learn more about current research evaluating the effects of kaolin clay in vineyards. Cody Copp Dec Video. Learn more about what Grapevine Red Blotch Disease is, how to prevent it, and how to test grapevines for the disease.

Patricia A. Skinkis, Justin Litwin Mar Article. Describes dark red and blush sweet cherry cultivars, including harvest timing, color when ripe, suggested pollinizers and rootstocks, size, firmness, yield potential, and other traits.

Includes color photo of each cultivar. Ashley Thompson, Matthew Whiting, Lynn Long Jan Extension Catalog publication Peer reviewed Orange level. Grapevine red blotch virus GRVB is one of about 80 viruses infecting wine grapes worldwide. It may affect fruit ripening and thus impact the quality of finished wines.

GRBV incidence increased from two to Daniel Dalton, Jessica Buser-Young, Samantha Nizich, Alexander Levin, Vaughn Walton, Richard Hilton, Linda Brewer Jan Extension Catalog publication Peer reviewed Orange level.

Kym Pokorny Jan 4, News story. Ask Extension is a way for you to get answers from the Oregon State University Extension Service. We have experts in family and health, community development, food and agriculture, coastal issues, forestry, programs for young people, and gardening.

Home Crop production Wine grapes Grape variety identification. English Español. Many grapes for the home garden are American grape varieties, as they are more disease resistant. Some are crosses between American Vitis species and European grape species Vitis vinifera. Therefore, if you suspect that your grapevine is decades old, it may be one of the more traditional cultivars available through garden centers.

If you want help identifying your grapevine, contact your county Extension office for assistance. Specifically inquire with the Master Gardener Help Desk , as they may be able to further assist in cultivar identification based on their experience and other local resources.

However, make sure that you have clear photos that identify the plant parts see Ampelography below. Make sure you have photos of your plant with ripe, disease-free fruit. Having diseased or unhealthy plant tissue makes it difficult for cultivar identification.

Commercial growers If you do not have records of the plant material planted in your vineyards, there two ways to determine the cultivar and rootstock. Muscat Hamburg. Negra Mole. Nerello Cappuccio. Nerello Mascalese.

Nero d'Avola. Nero di Troia. Petit Verdot. Petite Sirah. Pineau d'Aunis. Pinot Meunier. Pinot Nero. Pinot Noir. Plavac Mali.

Prieto Picudo. Prugnolo Gentile. Refosco di Faedis. Ruby Cabernet. Schwarzblauer Riesling. Sev Areni. St Laurent. Tinta Amarela. Tinta Barroca.

Tinta Cão. Tinta Carvalha. Tinta Miúda. Tinta Negra. Tinta Pinheira. It is a temperamental grape to grow and vinify, as its potent spiciness can be overbearing when unchecked.

At its best, is produces a floral and refreshing wine with crisp acidity that pairs well with spicy dishes. When left for late harvest, it's uncommonly rich and complex, yielding a tremendous dessert wine. Gewurztraminer is also popular in Eastern Europe, New Zealand, and the Pacific Northwest.

Drought and heat resistant, Grenache grapes yield a fruity, spicy, medium-bodied wine with supple tannins. The second most widely planted grape in the world, Grenache is widespread in the southern RhôneValley.

It figures strongly in the blend of Chateauneuf-du-Pape although there are some pure varietals , and it is used on its own for the rose wines of Tavel and Lirac; it is also used in France's sweet Banyuls wine.

Grenache is also important in Spain , where it's known as Garnacha Tinta; it is especially noteworthy in Rioja and Priorat. Grenache used to be more popular in Australia, but has now been surpassed by Syrah, although a few Barossa Valley producers are making wines with Grenache similar to Chateauneuf-du-Pape.

In California, it's a workhorse-blending grape, although occasionally old vines are found and its grapes are made into a varietal wine, which at its best can be quite good. It may make a comeback as enthusiasts of Rhône style wines seek cooler areas and an excellent blending grape.

Malbec was once important in Bordeaux and the Loire, where it figured into various blends, but it has steadily lost ground in recent years. This 'not very hardy' grape as been steadily replaced by Merlot and the two Cabernets.

However, Argentina is markedly successful with this varietal. In fact, some of that country's finest wines are made exclusively from Malbec.

In the United States, Malbec is used almost exclusively as a blending grape, and an insignificant one at that, but a few wineries use it, the most obvious reason being that it is considered part of the Bordeaux cepage or blend. Marsanne is popular in the Rhône along with Grenache Blanc, Roussane and Viognier and Australia, especially in Victoria, which now has some of the world's oldest Marsanne vineyards.

At its best, Marsanne can be a full-bodied, moderately intense wine with spice, pear and citrus notes. Merlot is the red-wine success of the s: its popularity has soared along with its acreage, and it seems wine lovers can't get enough of it. It dominates Bordeaux, except for the Medoc and Graves.

Although it is mainly used as a supporting player in the Bordeaux blend, it can stand alone. In St. Emilion and Pomerol, especially, it produces noteworthy wines, culminating in Chateau Petrus - Bordeaux's most expensive wine.

In Italy it's everywhere, though most of the Merlot there is light, unremarkable stuff. However, there are strong exceptions to that rule.

Despite its popularity, its quality ranges only from good to very good most of the time, though there are a few stellar producers found around the world. Several styles of Merlot have emerged in California. One is a Cabernet-style Merlot, which includes a high percentage up to 25 percent of Cabernet blended into the Merlot.

A second style is less reliant on Cabernet, so it yields a softer, suppler, medium-weight, less tannic wine that features more herb, cherry and chocolate flavors. A third style is a very light and simple wine; this type's sales are fueling Merlot's overall growth.

As long as the weather is warm, Mourvèdre ably tolerates a wide variety of soils. It is popular across the south of France, especially in Provence, where it is responsible for the greatness of Bandol, and many a fine red Cotes-du-Rhône.

It is often blended in Chateauneuf-du-Pape; Languedoc makes it as a varietal. Spain uses it in many areas, including Valencia. In the United States, Mourvèdre remains a minor factor for now, pursued by a few wineries that specialize in Rhône-style wines. The wine it produces can be quite pleasing, with medium weight, spicy cherry and berry flavors and moderate tannins.

It ages well. Muscat is a legacy of the ancient world. Today, it is known primarily as Muscat, Muscat Blanc, or Muscat Canelli. It is marked by strong spice and floral notes, and it can be produced as a varietal or used in blending, its primary function in California.

Moscato in Italy, Moscatel in Iberia, this grape can turn into anything from the low-alcohol, sweet and frothy Moscato d' Asti and Muscat de Canelli to bone-dry wines like Muscat d' Alsace.

Muscat also produces fortified wine such as Beaume de Venise. The great grape of Northern Italy, where it excels in Barolo and Barbaresco, Nebbiolo fashions strong, flavorful, age-worthy wines.

Mainly unsuccessful elsewhere, Nebbiolo is struggling to gain a small foothold in California. So far, the Nebbiolo wines from California have been light and uncomplicated, bearing little resemblance to their Italian cousins. Petite Sirah has long been favored as a blending grape in France and California, where it offers otherwise simple, light-colored wines greater color, depth, intensity, and tannin.

Petite Sirah is actually related to Durif, a minor French varietal, and is not a true Syrah. As tastes change, Petite Sirah, with its ripe berry flavors and crisp, chewy tannins, has begun to fall out of favor.

Moreover, the dense, inky examples of Petite Sirah that show so much promise early in their lives fail more often than not to improve with age, only becoming more tannic and earthy.

Now believed to be related to Pinot Noir and not Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc was once extensively referred to as the poor man's Chardonnay because of the two grapes similar characteristics.

Presently, Pinot Blanc is used in Champagne, Burgundy, Alsace, Germany, Italy, and California, where it can make terrific wines. When well made, Pinot Blanc is intense, concentrated and complex, with ripe pear, spice, citrus, and honey notes. It can age well, but is best early on while its fruit shines through.

Known as Pinot Grigio in Italy, where it is grown extensively in the northeast part of the country, this varietal produces quite a lot of very drinkable dry white wines as well as Collio's excellent whites.

As Pinot Gris, it used to be grown in Burgundy and in the Loire Valley, although it has been supplanted there. However, Pinot Gris comes into its own in Alsace-where it is known as Tokay. Southern Germany plants it as Rulander.

When fine, this varietal is soft and gently perfumed. Moreover, it possesses more color and charm than most whites. Pinot Noir, the great red grape of Burgundy, is a touchy varietal. The best examples offer the classic black cherry, spice, raspberry, and currant flavors, and an aroma that can resemble wilted roses, as well as earth, tar, herb and cola notes.

Conversely, Pinot Noir can also be rather ordinary, light, simple, herbal, vegetal and even weedy. Other times, it can be downright funky, with pungent barnyard aromas.

In fact, Pinot Noir is the most fickle of all grapes to grow: It reacts strongly to environmental changes such as heat and cold spells, and it is notoriously fussy to work with once picked, since its skins are easily bruised and broken.

Even after fermentation, Pinot Noir can hide its weaknesses and strengths, making it a most difficult wine to evaluate out of barrel. In the bottle, too, it is often a chameleon, showing poorly one day, brilliantly the next.

Nevertheless, it can and does produce some of the planet's greatest red wines, like Romanee Conti. Primitivo, referring to the early ripening of this ancient varietal rather than any supposed rusticity, hails originally from Greece.

It was most likely brought to southern Italy more than 2, years ago by the Greeks, who named Apulia and the nearby Italian peninsula Enotria - land of the vine - because of its natural proclivity for the production of wine. Today, Primitivo remains one of the most important varietals in southern Apulia, especially on the Salento peninsula.

In addition to being the earliest maturing grape variety in Europe, and perhaps the world, it is also capable of registering the highest sugar content of any grape, translating into the world's most alcoholic table wine. Recent DNA evidence points to Primitivo as the forebear of California Zinfandel, a grape with which it shares many common characteristics, thereby ending the mystery surrounding the origin of Zinfandel.

Riesling wines can be distinguished by their floral perfume, but after that they vary widely. In Germany's Mosel-Saar-Ruwer area, the wines are delicate and subtle, with very low-alcohol, while in the Pfalz they become spicy, exuberant and full-bodied.

In Alsace, the result is more often than not bone-dry. Because Riesling is one of the grapes susceptible to Botrytis cinerea, it also produces luscious late-harvest dessert wines.

In addition to Germany and Alsace, Australia, Austria, and New Zealand also produce some compelling Rieslings.

JavaScript seems Grape Varieties Guide be disabled in Grape Varieties Guide browser. For the best experience on our Varjeties, be GGuide to turn Varisties Javascript in your Ghide. Valentine's Day Sale! Wine grape varietals are defined as the individual types of grapes that find their way into the world's wines. There are upwards of four thousand distinct grape varieties in the world, but the vast majority of wines we consume are from less than three-dozen of the world's finest varietals of the genus Vitis vinifera.

Grape Varieties Guide -

Our grape variety guides below take your through tasting notes, wine styles and wine regions around the world in which they are grown, as well as top tips on food to pair them with.

Content Hub - Wine Guide - Grape Varieties Grape Varieties When it comes to enjoying wine, near enough everything begins with the grape variety. Red Grape Varieties. Barbera Learn more about this grape variety. Cabernet Franc Learn more about this grape variety. Cabernet Sauvignon Learn more about this grape variety.

Carignan Learn more about this grape variety. Carménère Learn more about this grape variety. Cinsault Learn more about this grape variety.

Corvina Learn more about this grape variety. Gamay Learn more about this grape variety. Grenache Learn more about this grape variety. Malbec Learn more about this grape variety. Merlot Learn more about this grape variety.

Montepulciano Learn more about this grape variety. Nebbiolo Learn more about this grape variety. Pinot Meunier Learn more about this grape variety.

Pinot Noir Learn more about this grape variety. Pinotage Learn more about this grape variety. Sangiovese Learn more about this grape variety. Shiraz Learn more about this grape variety. Tempranillo Learn more about this grape variety.

Zinfandel Primitivo Learn more about this grape variety. White Grape Varieties. Albariño Learn more about this grape variety. This 'not very hardy' grape as been steadily replaced by Merlot and the two Cabernets.

However, Argentina is markedly successful with this varietal. In fact, some of that country's finest wines are made exclusively from Malbec. In the United States, Malbec is used almost exclusively as a blending grape, and an insignificant one at that, but a few wineries use it, the most obvious reason being that it is considered part of the Bordeaux cepage or blend.

Marsanne is popular in the Rhône along with Grenache Blanc, Roussane and Viognier and Australia, especially in Victoria, which now has some of the world's oldest Marsanne vineyards. At its best, Marsanne can be a full-bodied, moderately intense wine with spice, pear and citrus notes.

Merlot is the red-wine success of the s: its popularity has soared along with its acreage, and it seems wine lovers can't get enough of it. It dominates Bordeaux, except for the Medoc and Graves.

Although it is mainly used as a supporting player in the Bordeaux blend, it can stand alone. In St. Emilion and Pomerol, especially, it produces noteworthy wines, culminating in Chateau Petrus - Bordeaux's most expensive wine.

In Italy it's everywhere, though most of the Merlot there is light, unremarkable stuff. However, there are strong exceptions to that rule. Despite its popularity, its quality ranges only from good to very good most of the time, though there are a few stellar producers found around the world.

Several styles of Merlot have emerged in California. One is a Cabernet-style Merlot, which includes a high percentage up to 25 percent of Cabernet blended into the Merlot.

A second style is less reliant on Cabernet, so it yields a softer, suppler, medium-weight, less tannic wine that features more herb, cherry and chocolate flavors.

A third style is a very light and simple wine; this type's sales are fueling Merlot's overall growth. As long as the weather is warm, Mourvèdre ably tolerates a wide variety of soils.

It is popular across the south of France, especially in Provence, where it is responsible for the greatness of Bandol, and many a fine red Cotes-du-Rhône. It is often blended in Chateauneuf-du-Pape; Languedoc makes it as a varietal.

Spain uses it in many areas, including Valencia. In the United States, Mourvèdre remains a minor factor for now, pursued by a few wineries that specialize in Rhône-style wines.

The wine it produces can be quite pleasing, with medium weight, spicy cherry and berry flavors and moderate tannins. It ages well.

Muscat is a legacy of the ancient world. Today, it is known primarily as Muscat, Muscat Blanc, or Muscat Canelli. It is marked by strong spice and floral notes, and it can be produced as a varietal or used in blending, its primary function in California.

Moscato in Italy, Moscatel in Iberia, this grape can turn into anything from the low-alcohol, sweet and frothy Moscato d' Asti and Muscat de Canelli to bone-dry wines like Muscat d' Alsace. Muscat also produces fortified wine such as Beaume de Venise. The great grape of Northern Italy, where it excels in Barolo and Barbaresco, Nebbiolo fashions strong, flavorful, age-worthy wines.

Mainly unsuccessful elsewhere, Nebbiolo is struggling to gain a small foothold in California. So far, the Nebbiolo wines from California have been light and uncomplicated, bearing little resemblance to their Italian cousins. Petite Sirah has long been favored as a blending grape in France and California, where it offers otherwise simple, light-colored wines greater color, depth, intensity, and tannin.

Petite Sirah is actually related to Durif, a minor French varietal, and is not a true Syrah. As tastes change, Petite Sirah, with its ripe berry flavors and crisp, chewy tannins, has begun to fall out of favor.

Moreover, the dense, inky examples of Petite Sirah that show so much promise early in their lives fail more often than not to improve with age, only becoming more tannic and earthy. Now believed to be related to Pinot Noir and not Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc was once extensively referred to as the poor man's Chardonnay because of the two grapes similar characteristics.

Presently, Pinot Blanc is used in Champagne, Burgundy, Alsace, Germany, Italy, and California, where it can make terrific wines. When well made, Pinot Blanc is intense, concentrated and complex, with ripe pear, spice, citrus, and honey notes.

It can age well, but is best early on while its fruit shines through. Known as Pinot Grigio in Italy, where it is grown extensively in the northeast part of the country, this varietal produces quite a lot of very drinkable dry white wines as well as Collio's excellent whites. As Pinot Gris, it used to be grown in Burgundy and in the Loire Valley, although it has been supplanted there.

However, Pinot Gris comes into its own in Alsace-where it is known as Tokay. Southern Germany plants it as Rulander. When fine, this varietal is soft and gently perfumed.

Moreover, it possesses more color and charm than most whites. Pinot Noir, the great red grape of Burgundy, is a touchy varietal. The best examples offer the classic black cherry, spice, raspberry, and currant flavors, and an aroma that can resemble wilted roses, as well as earth, tar, herb and cola notes.

Conversely, Pinot Noir can also be rather ordinary, light, simple, herbal, vegetal and even weedy. Other times, it can be downright funky, with pungent barnyard aromas. In fact, Pinot Noir is the most fickle of all grapes to grow: It reacts strongly to environmental changes such as heat and cold spells, and it is notoriously fussy to work with once picked, since its skins are easily bruised and broken.

Even after fermentation, Pinot Noir can hide its weaknesses and strengths, making it a most difficult wine to evaluate out of barrel. In the bottle, too, it is often a chameleon, showing poorly one day, brilliantly the next.

Nevertheless, it can and does produce some of the planet's greatest red wines, like Romanee Conti. Primitivo, referring to the early ripening of this ancient varietal rather than any supposed rusticity, hails originally from Greece.

It was most likely brought to southern Italy more than 2, years ago by the Greeks, who named Apulia and the nearby Italian peninsula Enotria - land of the vine - because of its natural proclivity for the production of wine.

Today, Primitivo remains one of the most important varietals in southern Apulia, especially on the Salento peninsula. In addition to being the earliest maturing grape variety in Europe, and perhaps the world, it is also capable of registering the highest sugar content of any grape, translating into the world's most alcoholic table wine.

Recent DNA evidence points to Primitivo as the forebear of California Zinfandel, a grape with which it shares many common characteristics, thereby ending the mystery surrounding the origin of Zinfandel.

Riesling wines can be distinguished by their floral perfume, but after that they vary widely. In Germany's Mosel-Saar-Ruwer area, the wines are delicate and subtle, with very low-alcohol, while in the Pfalz they become spicy, exuberant and full-bodied. In Alsace, the result is more often than not bone-dry.

Because Riesling is one of the grapes susceptible to Botrytis cinerea, it also produces luscious late-harvest dessert wines. In addition to Germany and Alsace, Australia, Austria, and New Zealand also produce some compelling Rieslings.

Sangiovese is best known for providing the backbone for many superb Italian red wines, including Chianti and Brunello di Montalcino, as well as the so-called SuperTuscan blends. Sangiovese is distinctive for its supple texture and medium-to-full-bodied spice, raspberry, cherry and anise flavors.

When blended with a grape such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Sangiovese gives the resulting wine a smoother texture and more supple tannins.

Sauvignon Blanc is a white varietal with a notable aroma, which is often characterized as "grassy" or "herbal. As part of a blend, the grape is all over Bordeaux, in Pessac-Leognan, Graves and the Medoc; it also shows up in Sauternes. New Zealand has had striking success with Sauvignon Blanc in recent years, producing its own perfumed, fruity style that has spread to North America and back to France.

On its own or in a blend, this white varietal can age. With Sauvignon Blanc, its traditional partner and life long friend, Semillon is the foundation of Sauternes and most of the great dry whites found in Graves and Pessac-Leognan; these are rich, honeyed wines. Semillon is one of the grapes susceptible to Botrytis cinerea.

Australia's Hunter Valley uses it solo to make a full-bodied white that used to be known as Hunter Riesling, Chablis or White Burgundy. In South Africa, this grape was once so prevalent that it was just called "wine grape," but production there has declined drastically in recent years.

Semillon can make a wonderful late-harvest wine, and those wineries that focus on it can make well-balanced wines with complex fig, pear, tobacco and honey notes.

When blended into Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon adds body, flavor and texture. When Sauvignon Blanc is added to Semillon, the latter gains fresh, grassy herbal notes. Hermitage and Cote-Rotie in France, the great old vines renditions of South Australia-the epitome of Syrah is a majestic red that can age for half a century.

The grape seems to grow well in a number of areas and is capable of rendering rich, complex, and distinctive wines, with pronounced pepper, spice, black cherry, tar, leather and roasted nut flavors, as well as a smooth, supple texture and ripe tannins.

In the south of France, it finds its way into various blends, as in Chateauneuf-du-Pape and the better wines of the Languedoc-Roussillon. Known as Shiraz in Australia, Syrah was long used there for bread-and-butter blends, but an increasing number of high-quality varietal bottlings are now being made, especially from old vines in the Barossa Valley.

Tempranillo is the ubiquitous Spanish grape varietal that is responsible primarily or in part for nearly every great Spanish red, whether it is from Rioja, Priorat, or Ribera del Duero.

Its greatness is almost always consummate with the skill of the winemaker and the yield per acre. Trebbiano in Italy and Ugni Blanc in France. Regardless of the name, this varietal is tremendously prolific; low in alcohol but high in acidity, it is found in almost any basic white Italian wine.

It is so ingrained in Italian winemaking that it is actually a sanctioned, ingredient of the blend used for red Chianti and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. However, most current Tuscan producers choose not add it to their wines, any longer. Viognier, the rare white grape of France's Rhône Valley, is one if the most difficult grapes to grow.

Nevertheless, fans of this floral, spicy white wine are thrilled by its prospects in the south of France and in the New World, most especially in California and Chile. The origins of this tremendously versatile and popular grape are still not known for certain, although it is thought to have come from Southern Italy as a cousin of Primitivo.

Zinfandel is the most widely planted red grape in California although Australia has also played around with the grape. Much of it is vinified into white Zinfandel, a blush colored, slightly sweet wine.

Real Zinfandel, the red wine, is the quintessential California red. It can also be used for blending with other grapes, including Cabernet Sauvignon and Petite Sirah.

It has been made in a claret style, with berry and cherry flavors, mild tannins and oak shadings. Zinfandel has also been made into a full-bodied, ultra-ripe, intensely flavored and firmly tannic wine designed to age.

In addition, it is sometimes made into late harvest and Port-style wines that feature very ripe, raisiny flavors, alcohol levels above 15 percent and chewy tannins. At its best, Zinfandel can and often does produce shining wines that are ready to drink when only a couple of years old.

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Assuring satisfaction to over 2,, CUSTOMERS since has earned us an rating from the BBB. Skip to Content. Home Learn the Different Types of Wine Grape Varietals. Learn The Different Types of Wine Grape Varietals Wine grape varietals are defined as the individual types of grapes that find their way into the world's wines.

Arneis White [ahr-NAYZ] Arneis is an ancient grape variety native to the Roero district of Italy's Piedmont. Barbera Red [bar-BEHR-uh] The Barbera grape variety is the most successful type of grapes in Italy's Piedmont region, where it makes such wines as Barbera d' Asti, Barbera di Monferato and Barbera di Alba.

Brunello Red [broo-NEHL-oh] This strain of Sangiovese is the only grape permitted for Brunello di Montalcino, the rare, costly Tuscan red that at its best is loaded with luscious black and red fruits and chewy tannins. Cabernet Franc Red [cab-er-NAY FRAHNK] Cabernet Franc grapes as a varietal in wine, usually benefits from small amounts of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, and can be as intense and full-bodied as either of these wines.

Cabernet Sauvignon Red [cab-er-NAY SO-vin-yon] The undisputed king of red wines, Cabernet Sauvignon grapes are remarkably steady and consistent performers through much of the world.

Carignan Red [karin-YAN] Carignan grapes varietals are also known as Carignane California or Cirnano Italy. Charbono Red [SHAR-bono] Found mainly in California, Charbono grapes have dwindled in acreage. Chardonnay White [shar-dun-NAY] If Cabernet Sauvignon is the king of reds, Chardonnay is the king of white wines, it makes consistently excellent, rich, and complex whites.

Chenin Blanc White [SHEN'N BLAHNK] This native of the Loire valley has two personalities: at home it is the basis of such famous, long-lived wines as Vouvray and Anjou, Quarts de Chaume and Saumur, but on other soils it becomes just a very good blending grape.

When it comes to enjoying wine, near enough everything Grape Varieties Guide with Grape Varieties Guide grape variety. Varietiex Grape Varieties Guide Improving immune response knowledge and learn about which varieties Varietie the wine styles you love, as Vzrieties as Varietirs which Varietiss end being your next favourite wines to try! Our grape variety guides below take your through tasting notes, wine styles and wine regions around the world in which they are grown, as well as top tips on food to pair them with. Content Hub - Wine Guide - Grape Varieties Grape Varieties When it comes to enjoying wine, near enough everything begins with the grape variety. Red Grape Varieties. Barbera Learn more about this grape variety. Cabernet Franc Learn more about this grape variety.

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